Getting across a visceral sense of climate change is one of the hardest problems in science writing. Daniel Crawford, an undergraduate at the University of Minnesota decided to use a tool that’s inherently visceral — music. He wrote “Song of a Warming Planet.” It’s a small thing, but with the incredible complexity of climate change it’s going to take a lot of very different ideas to help people understand the big picture. Read more at Ensia.

» Ben

6video, music, climate change, large,

99% Invisible-114- Ten Thousand Years
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Ten Thousand Years

Roman Mars calls his podcast 99 Percent Invisible “a tiny radio show,” but in this episode they tackle a gigantic time scale. Here, they take a trip both back to 1990 and forward to ten thousand years in the future, when all of us are gone and the waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is still there. How do you explain radioactivity to people who won’t have the same language or culture you do? 

» Rose

Source: SoundCloud / Roman Mars

699pi, design, radioactivity, science, podcast, radio, audio, roman mars,

Universe Splitter

Here is the final pick from Sean Carroll, this week’s guest picker! It’s part two of an exploration of the many world’s interpretation of quantum mechanics. (Part 1 is here, part 2 is here.)

We’ll close out with something a little different: an iPhone app called “Universe Splitter.” You type in two alternatives (e.g. “go to the gym” and “eat ice cream”). The app pings a laboratory in Geneva, which sends a particle down a beam-splitter, observes which way it goes, and returns the answer to you. According to Many-Worlds, once that happens there will be two copies of the universe, each one of which you got one of your two possible answers. If you follow through on the alternatives, there will be one universe in which you enjoyed the ice cream, and another in which you worked out. Seriously.

Download Universe Splitter here »

Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at Caltech, specializing in cosmology, gravitation, and quantum mechanics. His most recent book is The Particle at the End of the Universe.

6physics, many worlds, sean carroll, large,

Quantum Mechanics (an embarrassment)

Here is the second pick from Sean Carroll, this week’s guest picker! It’s part two of an exploration of the many world’s interpretation of quantum mechanics. (Part 1 is here, part three is here.)

Next we have one from Sixty Symbols, which is a combination of live interviews and demonstrations from Brady Haran in the UK. This one actually features me, but I recommend it anyway.

See more from Sixty Symbols »

Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at Caltech, specializing in cosmology, gravitation, and quantum mechanics. His most recent book is The Particle at the End of the Universe.

6physics, video, quantum mechanics, sean carroll,

Parallel Universes: Many Worlds

Our guest picker this week is Sean M. Carroll! He’s put together a collection on the many worlds formulation of quantum mechanics. Strap in as we take a tour through this fascinating part of fundamental physics. (Parts 2 and 3 coming Wednesday and Friday.)

I have two YouTube videos to recommend. Both are about quantum mechanics and many-worlds, but I also want to promote the larger series of which they each are a part. First up is an offering from Minute Physics, which is a wonderful series of hand-drawn animations by Henry Reich.

See more Minute Physics videos here »

Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at Caltech, specializing in cosmology, gravitation, and quantum mechanics. His most recent book is The Particle at the End of the Universe.

6physics, video, quantum mechanics,

How Mendel’s pea plants helped us understand genetics

Most of us remember the tedium of filling out Punnett squares in 7th-grade biology class. Remember, those grids showing how genetic alleles segregate from one generation to the next? Oh, you don’t remember? This animation gives a fun reminder, which will probably be helpful the next time you read about the latest genetic study. Punnett squares have never been so cute. 

See the full lesson on TED-Ed »

This is the final pick by our first guest picker, Virginia Hughes. Also note the voiceover, by our own Rose Eveleth.

Virginia Hughes is a journalist based in Brooklyn, New York, who writes for a wide variety of magazines. She focuses on the brain, behavior, and genetics for her blog, Only Human, which is hosted by National Geographic.

6video, biology, genetics,

Please welcome our first guest picker, Virginia Hughes! Here’s her first pick:

A few weeks ago I saw UCSF neuroscientist Adam Gazzaley give a talk about his group’s Glass Brain project, which produces three-dimensional visualizations of a live human brain based on data from a suite of brain-imaging technologies. This clip takes you on a short, flashy ride through our most mysterious organ.

Read more about the Glass Brain Project here »

Virginia Hughes is a journalist based in Brooklyn, New York, who writes for a wide variety of magazines. She focuses on the brain, behavior, and genetics for her blog, Only Human, which is hosted by National Geographic.

6neuroscience, video, visualization,

Guest Pickers!

Science Studio has always been a collaborative effort. In our first year we got submissions from hundreds of people, and turned to a team of amazing judges to whittle down to the final picks. We’ve changed a lot about Science Studio, but we don’t want to lose that collaborative spirit for finding and selecting work.

So we’re inviting in some of you to show us what you think is the best. We’re calling these very prestigious people our “Guest Pickers” and they’ll stop by Science Studio and drop off a few of their favorite sciencey multimedia.

To start us off we have the fabulous Virginia Hughes—a science journalist who writes for the likes of The New Yorker online, Slate, Smithsonian, Mosaic and more. Her blog, Only Human, is hosted by National Geographic Magazine, and she’s also a contributing editor at Popular Science and MATTER. On top of all that, a video Virginia made was selected for our 2013 collection!

Want to be a Guest Picker? Just send us a note at info@sciencestudio.org and tell us who you are. If you just want to send along some ideas for stuff we could post, our nomination form is still live here.

6large, guest, guest picker, info,

(Not Really) the Last Word on DNA

How does all your DNA fit into your cells? This charming little animation does a great job at explaining one theory. Taking a new study published in The EMBO Journal, Virginia Hughes tells a whimsical and impressively clear tale of the twisting, turning and packing that your DNA does.

From our 2013 collection

6biology, cells, 2013, small,

Comic books are an incredibly powerful medium, and journalism is finally figuring that out. This piece, written by Sarah Laskow and illustrated by Symbolia in partnership with Years of Living Dangerously, is an awesome example of combining story telling, art and science into a killer package. 

» Rose

6comics, climate change, science, climate, multimedia,

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