Ebola spreads slower, kills more than other diseases

If you haven’t heard, people are worried about ebola. Some of them should be: care workers who have come into contact with people infected with ebola, for example. Most people shouldn’t be. There have been a lot of great graphics and explainers about ebola over the past few weeks, but this one might be my favorite so far. This little animation from the Washington Post shows just how fast ebola spreads, and how many people it kills, compared to other diseases. »Rose

6large, graphic, infographic, interactive, animation, ebola, health, risk, washingtonpost,

Exploring Ocean Tectonics from Space

Ever wondered what’s under the ocean? Well now you can take a super detailed tour, thanks to a team from UCSD and their . This map is far more detailed than previous ocean floor maps, and the science behind it was recently published in the journal Science. I just lost about an hour exploring some of my favorite dive sites topographies, so beware. »Rose

6interactive, maps, globes, science, research, multimedia, earth, oceans, Environment,

The Clockwork Saw

This is the first episode of Dr Lindsey Fitzharris’s new show called “Under the Knife”, a YouTube series dedicated to the horrors of pre-anaesthetic surgery, and I am already in love. In this episode, she introduces us to her favorite old medical device: the clockwork saw. It’s about as weird and gruesome and awesome as you might expect, and Fitzharris’s delivery is great. Really looking forward to seeing more disgusting and delightful episodes. » Rose

6large, video, history, medical history, surgery, history of science,

‘Animated Life: Seeing the Invisible’

We’ve featured the work of Flora Lichtman and Sharon Shattuck before, and we’re unabashedly doing it again. This piece, the latest in their Animated Life series, documents the story of Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the man who discovered the tiny world of microbes. I just love the paper cutouts in these pieces, and their really beautiful storytelling. »Rose

6video, microbes, microbioloy, animation, paper cutouts,

Losing Ground

ProPublica has an incredible investigation up now on the shrinking state of Louisiana. Over the past 80 years, nearly 2,000 square miles of its coastal landscape have been lost to the ocean. The state is shrinking, and this interactive combines amazing data, great reporting and beautiful design. Don’t miss all the tiny details too. » Rose

6ProPublica, wetlands, louisiana, water, environment, interactive, graphics,

Media for Thinking the Unthinkable

Today’s pick is a scannable collection of software demonstration videos, all designed as prototypes of “a new medium for science and engineering” that amplifies/extends intuition and the senses as much as analytical thinking. Demos start with a redesign of the traditional scientific journal article and head down the rabbit hole from there.

Exploring natural systems and communicating discoveries about them (i.e., doing science) is a creative act. What if manipulating differential equations and modeling nonlinear dynamical systems were like using Photoshop or Final Cut Pro? As “citizen science” gains traction, it’s thrilling to imagine what kinds of digital tools might enhance 21st-century “naturalists’” curiosity and analytical power.

This week’s picker is John Pavlus — a designer on the inside and a writer/filmmaker on the outside. He makes things that make things make sense for places like NPR, HHMI, Scientific American, Fast Company, Nautilus, and others. 

6website, design, media, illustration, demos,

How Life on Earth Began

Today’s pick is an animated overview of the latest thinking on the biggest mystery in science. With paper cutouts. I love how this video wraps one concrete scientific question around a deeper, simpler, but more philosophical one: What is life, anyway? The notion that life on earth didn’t have a special “start” but probably cross-faded into existence as bags of inanimate reactive chemicals randomly mixed into more “life-like” combinations is deeply strange and fascinating. I’ve never seen it visualized so succinctly. This video isn’t flashy, but it does its job very well: it makes me want to know more.

This week’s picker is John Pavlus — a designer on the inside and a writer/filmmaker on the outside. He makes things that make things make sense for places like NPR, HHMI, Scientific American, Fast Company, Nautilus, and others. 

6video, biology, evolution, life,

Storm Chasing on Saturn

This video is a short news video showing/explaining a storm on the north pole of Saturn bigger than four Earths in the shape of a hexagon. A storm on the north pole of Saturn, bigger than four Earths, in the shape of a hexagon. Oh also, it has alien aurorae glowing over it. The word “awesome” should be reserved for sights like this. The video also boasts impeccable sound design, limpid graphics, and a slam-dunk visual proof of how such a strange phenomenon could occur naturally. Take that, intelligent-design advocates.

This week’s picker is John Pavlus — a designer on the inside and a writer/filmmaker on the outside. He makes things that make things make sense for places like NPR, HHMI, Scientific American, Fast Company, Nautilus, and others. 

6video, new york times, nyt, space, physics,

The Weight of Mountains

Here’s a short film by a children’s book illustrator about “the processes by which mountains are created and eventually destroyed, based upon the work of British geographer L. Dudley Stamp.” It’s eye-meltingly gorgeous and starkly scientific. The tone is meditative and incantatory, turning geological terms into epic poetry. If you’ve ever wanted to read John McPhee’s “Annals of the Former World” but only have 11 minutes, watch this.

This week’s picker is John Pavlus — a designer on the inside and a writer/filmmaker on the outside. He makes things that make things make sense for places like NPR, HHMI, Scientific American, Fast Company, Nautilus, and others. 

6large, video, mountains, geography, geology,

A Spacecraft for All

This week’s guest picker is John Pavlus, and here is his first pick:

image

A Spacecraft for All 

This is a thrillingly well-designed interactive film/visualization about ISEE-3, a probe launched in 1978 to study the Sun, control of which was then lost, and recently regained by a citizen-science crowdfunding campaign, and then lost again. The filmmaking, the design (graphic, sound, interaction, user experience, typography, 3D), the narrative, the technological wizardry (of the project and of the film itself)… This is the acme of everything that modern science multimedia can be.

John Pavlus is a designer on the inside and a writer/filmmaker on the outside. He makes things that make things make sense for places like NPR, HHMI, Scientific American, Fast Company, Nautilus, and others. 

6space, citizen-science, design, graphics, film, video,

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